Scientists have confirmed the age-old notion that hot liquids can relieve some cold and flu symptoms. But what about a dose of heat on a much larger scale – say, in a sauna? The answer is yes, according to an article in the New York Times.

 

With temperatures of 176 Fahrenheit or greater, saunas have been recommended for arthritis, asthma and chronic fatigue syndrome, among other things, since they were used by nomads in Finland centuries ago. Some reputed benefits have not been studied scientifically, but there is evidence that saunas may speed recovery from colds and reduce their occurrence according to the Times report.

 

Some researchers suspect sauna heat reduces symptoms because it improves drainage, while others speculate that the high temperatures help weaken cold and flu viruses. Why this might prevent sickness in the first place, however, is unclear. But research suggests an effect.

 

Nobel‐Prize winner Dr. Andre Lwoff, a French virologist and microbiologist shared the 1965 prize in physiology and medicine for just such a theory. He reported that high temperatures during infection help combat the growth of a virus. High temperatures can be induced artificially and cause heavy sweating. He believes that high temperature during infection helps combat the growth of virus. “Therefore, fever should not be brought down with drugs,” he said.

 

In one study by Austrian researchers, a group of 50 adults were tracked for 6 months. One group was told to use a sauna regularly; the other group was told not to use a sauna. At the end of the study, the sauna bathing group had contracted half the number of colds than the non-sauna bathers.

 

This is great news! Sauna therapy is simple, natural, non-invasive and requires no drugs! Why not book a Sauna today!

Note, Sauna therapy is not recommended for those with cardiovascular, circulatory or other health conditions.

 

Original article can be found here.